Skip to main content

About your Search

20130101
20130131
STATION
CSPAN 9
CNNW 8
SFGTV2 8
CNN 5
CSPAN2 3
FBC 2
SFGTV 2
WHUT (Howard University Television) 2
CNBC 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
MSNBCW 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 53
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)
into. sometimes objects are too heavy for you to liftoff of a body. we will teach you privying which will use anything you have, wood or cement blocks so you is see that people can lift heavy objects off of people. now, you have to have a plan. every program needs to have a plan. we can't say, here are your skills. class 6, after half an hour we will split you into teams of 10 people each. putting out the fires. you will go into a dark room and doing a search. you will be treating people with injuries on them. be doing privying. lifting heavy objects off of a doll and giving iv and turning off utilities. we are building you up to the hand's on scenario. >> what do you do? let's say you feel a tremor and it's going to shake, what are you going to do? all right. 40 people said -- >> where we going to go? >> under a table. >> [laughter]. >> going to be survival of the fitef. fittest. if you have a table go under the table. look above you, what's going to fall. what's going to hit your head. most of the chairs decent. if you are in a movie theatre or stadium what do you do? the same
privy. but at least structure a fee that's a flat fee, a not to exceed fee. >> i remember we actually did this for small businesses when we were trying to encourage them to change their signage. >> yeah, that was the one --. >> in certain districts but i don't see why we can't make this particular situation city-wide. also i think the timing would be good. we could say we would wave it maybe for 30 days as soon as the wltion is passed, which would encourage landlord to want to just do it, to get a break if they do it within the first month, even though it's a 6-month period, that we would wave it then and i would defer to the staff on making what would be cost effective to try to lower it thereafter. >> deputy director sweeney may want to weigh in here. >> listening to the proceeding i would figure there would be two inspections, one to check that the block, the backing was put in correctly, and then the final. that would be two inspections. it would be up to the commission to see. >> do we have any mechanism in place now where we could just say, okay, it's a $25 or a $50 flat fee
with injuries on them. be doing privying. lifting heavy objects off of a doll and giving iv and turning off utilities. we are building you up to the hand's on scenario. >> what do you do? let's say you feel a tremor and it's going to shake, what are you going to do? all right. 40 people said -- >> where we going to go? >> under a table. >> [laughter]. >> going to be survival of the fitef. fittest. if you have a table go under the table. look above you, what's going to fall. what's going to hit your head. most of the chairs decent. if you are in a movie theatre or stadium what do you do? the same thing. these chairs are not heavy dutiy but covering your head is most important. if it's an empty room go against the wall and cover your head. a lot of cut in disaster heads and arms will get cut. those you can control the bleeding where as the head injury is harder. cover your head, the most important thing to do. we cover, beaware. 15 seconds. in the marina people said it felt like a minute. if you are covering yourself under the table and it's shaking what will happen in 30 seconds? you lo
yourself. so we had a lot of time to feel like -- we were privy to a lot of information through walter that you just normal access wouldn't allow you to know. so all that time was good, and i got to do "twilight" in between, which is obviously something that i'm really close to as well, and thank god. tavis: i'll come back to "on the road" in a second. are you -- i'm trying to pick -- i want to use the right word here. are you happy that "twilight" is now done? are you happy, relieved? you tell me. i don't know what the right word would be. >> i'm really happy that the story has been told. to have something like that weighing on you for five years is not -- as an actor, that is so not normal. usually it's a very condensed, really accelerated, charged period of time. so the last scene that we did on that movie, i was like, i've literally never felt lighter in my life. but at the same time, we got to live in that world for so long i really have no problem -- sometimes after five weeks it's hard to leave a character, but after five years, it's like, that's finished. tavis: how do you grow
was not privy too prior to -- getting to go. it was challenging to have a seat at the table and make our way through it and get our views taken seriously. >> go get a job and find the cure to cancer, we tax you at 45%. manage a hedge fund and you will pay 15%." >> a hedge fund is a fund that makes money by arbitrage. they try to exploit inefficiences in the system and for instance they may have arbitrage with intreserest rates or inefficiencies in currencies and they will take opposite positions. it is difficult to explain what hedge funds do. they are trading oprations. they have the long-term capital gains and pay theselves with carried interest. the fiction is they are paid to manage the money and generate profits. they have a percentage of the returns -- we tax them at the marginal rates. and the fiscal cliff legislation. >> the new secretary of the treasury is jack -- the chief of staff to the president. let me read something i picked up on wikipedia. he was named the chief operating officer of the investment unit and then they say -- the group he oversaw invested in a hedge fund that b
by the meeting that we're having with dhr, we're just basically going to be made privy of the decisions that were made by dhr in terms of their first cut, we're not making further cuts that day, that's why i was careful to make sure we didn't ask for any approval of anything after that point because that's when it would become more selective, we wanted the commission to have input on that and as far as the actual job description and the criteria, that will be available to the public as of tomorrow and it will be reviewable, we can make sure the whole commission should have a copy of that to review and it gives a lot of specificity as to the criteria and how they are weighed and these types of things. >> commissioner sugaya? >> yes, if we could give feedback to the sub-committee i guess at this point, as i understand it, the job description is going to get responded to human resources will go through and with linda avery, wilting -- wid l it down and then those who get the first cut will take the entrance exam, whatever you want to call it, the battery of questions and based on that, h.r. is goi
that are privy to information because that's their job. that is a breach of all sorts of rules and requirements and it is illegal. >> you say that the good news is the rules are on the book to stop it. we don't have to have rules, we need to import so we have? two i believe that. there have been enforcement actions. but the word now is that in light of the report, which was published, the sec is taking a closer look, and so is the u.s. attorney in new york. gerri: i am sure action will follow. harvey pitt, thank you so much. it's always great to see you. >> thank you. gerri: on to other government problems. remember casher clunkers? the white house proclaims an economic and environmental success. of course, we know it wasn't a success on the first count and now it turns out that they are not right about that one either. according to eu magazine, the cars were not recycle. they shredded them. that process sent tons of parts to landfills each year. so which cars ended up in the shredder? that list is tonight's top five. number five is the chevy blazer. 50 miles per gallon, about a clunker. this
and they think everything is a nail. they tried to argue from the privy -- existing point of view. ayn rand has a certain way of talking. a certain way of thinking. she thinks you should be confrontational and aggressive. allowing someone to state something you disagree with and being silent about it is really evil. she does not tolerate alternative points of view. she was the kind of person who would kick people out of her circle for disagreeing with her about music. that is how she was. a lot of libertarians get their first taste of of terrorism from that. i would not say the students i have had are any more dogmatic and the marxist to this ipad. i find among my students if they have a political point of view, they are dogmatic about it. they are not dogmatic, it is because they do not care about it. it is relatively rare to find somebody who has a point of view but is not dogmatic. >> if you are a marxist, how do you differ from the libertarians? >> in some respects, in terms of policy prescriptions, they are close to being the opposite. there are and kissed libertarians -- anarchists libert
for the republicans. >> congresswoman, what do you think about what john king is saying? >> i'm not privy to the president's processes and how he came up with the decision. all i can tell you is women have been dying and fighting for this nation in combat roles in iraq and afghanistan. they may not have had those jobs specifically other than aviation, my branch of service, they've been fighting in combat and engaged in combat action. i think the last ten years of women serving in combat has finally pushed us to this point where the pentagon has finally realized women have served ably and it's time we open up these folds. >> do you think the president is trying to box republicans into a corner? >> i don't know what the president is trying to do. all i can tell you is that i certainly as a politician supported this throughout my political career but even beforehand. i've been supporting this all along even when people said women aren't capable of doing it. yes, they are. they are capable of defending our country just as well as men. >> you don't want to say what's in the president's mind bu
club. they are younger and youth has it's privy. i think the 49er also win. >> what do you think about the match up between the harbaugh brothers? >> i think it's cool. first time in nfl history you have two brothers coaching two different teams going up against each other in the biggest game of all and that is the super bowl. it is a great narrative and great conversation for everybody this week. i know the nfl were hoping the manning brothers could match up never materialized not yet anyway. here's an opportunity right now to celebrate not only the game but also celebrate these two players -- two coaches anyway. >> greatest super bowl championship for you? >> the greatest for me? probably the very first. nothing sweeter than the very first. for the 49ers and some of the guys who never experienced the super bowl it will be an awesome experience. >> for hard work of becoming an nfl player years and years of practice hard on your body and mind as well and families, one potential future nfl player that has a little trouble going on now manti te'o. what do you think about his future in th
. it is a beautiful, beautiful thing. >> so, listen, you are in the industry and privy to a lot more of the conversations and the whisper rumors an all of those other award season events than a lot of other people. did you think this was going to be a reality or were you truly just shocked? >> i had sort of prepared myself that we were going to be celebrating the end of our publicity campaign today. now, we are celebrating a whole new era. we were shaking. we were so surprised. >> so quvenzhane, you are nine years old and from louisiana and you are officially the youngest for this award? do you know what a big deal that is? >> do i ever. >> that's awesome. tell me about doing this movie. you were only five years old when you auditioned and just six when you filmed it? >> yes. >> so tell me how tough this was. was it hard work? >> yes. >> explain to me what the best parts and the worst parts were like. >> best parts were the seafood. worst parts were the mud and the mosquitos and all the hard stuff. >> all the hard stuff. at six years old, gosh, that's three years ago. that's a third
been privy to conversations with these people throughout the 1980's. one last sentence. detectives james rothstein has stated that certain people never get prosecuted because of their connections. i hope this is not the case. thank you. >> next. you've not been called, sir. you need to go back and take a seat. >> hi. i live in petaluma. thanks for holding this forum. i am glad to hear you mention the high-grade shotguns of the aristocracy uses in england. help it does not come to that. it seems to be that politicians are aiming for rifles and pistols to be taking out of the citizens' hands and only birding guns will be left. i hope some point in the future you have may be a forum on hospital violence, for example. for more people are killed by medical actions in america than by guns. i am always fascinated that the first amendment is interpreted so liberally as to include a jar of urine with a crucifix in it, yet the second amendment is interpreted so strictly that the rights of the people shall not be infringed. it's somehow does not apply in many cases. i am glad to hear you say
're not able to be privy to that information and need deeper information, you have the ability by this law to do a competency evaluation, which is a little bit of deeper, further psychological testing to see how these people are thinking, how they're making their decisions. are they able to make a good judgment decision? those are the things that really all that you're ever going to be able to do, to be able to make a prediction if somebody could have a gun. >> let me ask you this, paul, when you think about james holmes, the alleged aurora shooter, would -- this potentially could have stopped him, right? he had made threats. there were psychiatrists at the university who were aware of that, who had raised the issue. if there were a statute like this on the books in colorado, might it have prevented that massacre? >> that's a great question, and the answer is, no, it wouldn't have stopped it. he's very -- that guy, that kid had a psychiatrist who was seeing him on a regular basis. he had verbalized to the psychiatrist, she had an obligation, legally, to seek his involuntary commitment to a
going on there. you know, i'm the not really privy to that, that much, in the sense that it's being handled in the probate court. i think that they have some disagreement about how she was going to pay the partner, the business partner that the deceased had, so, you know, and in that sense, is there discord? i think that that's probably accurate, but i think that that was after this happened. she doesn't have any discord with them, i think that they've got discord with her. >> greta: steve, thank you very much and good luck, sir. >> you're welcome. >> greta: an insurance giant aig obviously got the hint, like a 2 by 4 between the eyes. americans have been making their voices heard loud and clear after news yesterday that aig was considering joining the 25 billion dollar lawsuit against the very people who saved their company. the taxpayers. the 182 billion dollar aig bailout, they declined to join the lawsuit against the taxpayers after seeing the taxpayers outrage. and one tweeted please tell me it's a sick joke. david axlerod, definition of chutzpa, aig of saved by american taxpay
on the house democratic side. >> you are often privy to juicy little nuggets of behind-the-scenes information. do you have any thoughts on how vice president biden became so key to all of this? >> well, i think there is a basic trust factor that mitch mcconnell has with joe biden. they served together for over 20 years. they know each other. from a lot of conversations i had especially with the older bulls i sort of call them, they say joe biden is a guy you can do business with. that the president doesn't understand how to negotiate room to room, you know, person to person, that joe biden gets that. he gets the personality of it. and it's a relationship built up over years. so if anything, joe biden brings that sort of old school mentality to capitol hill and for all the children's we see in our country and for all of the sort of new faces that are coming in here, politically in the house and the senate, it still is very much run by folks in their 70s, the sort of old bulls who have been here a while and seen a lot. >> as we mentioned the republicans are meeting at 1:00 p.m. and you being th
to harry wachtel for example was very painful for him to admit to some of the aids that they were not privy to his private life that was more along the streets of the trilogy he admitted only that he was vulnerable to blackmail which is the issue of having extramarital affairs. c-span: you add up the women problems with elijah mohammed and john kennedy and i -- i don't need to go through the whole list, it comes that -- i mean there's a lot in your book. i mean, how -- what impact did relations with women on this whole movement during these periods? >> guest: what never became a public issue peaden tattnall the mexican -- eisel publicity around elijah mohammed's illegitimate children at his hope of salvation, that what puncture respect among these zealots who followed elijah mohammed and -- to the point of falling to kill for him, but he couldn't get it publicized, partly because people were afraid of the muslims and partly because they were freed of a libel suit. so it was a private prison and was used mostly for black male behind the scenes. it never became a public issue. you know, hoove
back from iran? did you have high-level meetings in which you were privy to information our state department is not privy to? >> well, we met with a range of people. we met with people from the government but students at the university. we were actually invited by the university of tehran. we met with students, professors. we met with a range of people in iran, and what we come back with is a sense that walking in the streets of tehran, going to the university, going into the marketplace, this is not a country that is on the brink of implosion, that sanctions are somehow going to cripple and force it to concede to american or any other demands. and this is something that when we did the research for our book, we found historically, we have seen american so-called iran experts predict literally since the founding of the republic of iran back in 1979, that this political order is on the brink of implosion or regime change. this is something coming back from our most recent trip to iran. just reinforced our research that that is not the case. for 32 years -- more than 32 years they'v
war vets from 92 to 2002, murdered by genocide. my knowledge a firsthand. i have been privy to conversations with these people throughout the 1980's. one last sentence. detectives james rothstein has stated that certain people never get prosecuted because of their connections. i hope this is not the case. thank you. >> next. you've not been called, sir. you need to go back and take a seat. >> hi. i live in petaluma. thanks for holding this form. -- forum. i am glad to hear you mention the high-grade shotguns of the aristocracy uses in england. help it does not come to that. it seems to be that politicians are aiming for rifles and pistols to be taking out of the citizens' hands and only birding guns will be left. i hope some point in the future you have may be a forum on hospital violence, for example. for more people are killed by medical actions in america than buy guns. -- by guns. i am always fascinated that the first amendment is interpreted so liberally as to include a jar of urine with a crucifix and ii, yet the second amendment is interpreted so strictly that the rig
to correspond internally. this is not something that everybody does unless they're privy too much, and saying everybody in the administration does it. and the inescapable threat of using this, you would subvert disclosing federal law. >> megyn: we're going to carry this segment over, because this is important. in your book you talk about it's not just the he epa and not just lisa jackson, there have been shocking examples of nontransparency within this administration to try to keep people who have the right to the information from getting it. from finding out what they're actually talking about on some important issues, so we're going to talk about that. i do want to ask you, you did get-- after she resigned you got a first wave of information that was released. did you find anything interesting under the richard windsor e-mail? >> i found that when they told fox news we have nothing to hide, that position is no longer operative because they, using the traditional black rectangle, blacked out the administration's name on the e-mail. and hiding from us the taxpayer, reagan says i'm paying for
department and i don't know who else was privy of those cables about the deep concern of security there and the need for additional assistance and i will argue with facts that after that event took place, after the fall of gadhafi, the, quote, soft footprint was partially, to some degree, responsible for the tragedy that took place. the american people and the families of these four brave americans still have not gotten the answers that they deserve. i hope that they will get them. >> well, senator, i understand your very strong feelings. you knew chris, you were a friend of chris. you were one of the staunch reporters in the efforts to dislodge gadhafi and try to give the libyan people a chance and we just have a disagreement. we have a disagreement about what did happen and when it happened with respect to explaining the sequence of events. we did get to talk to the ds agents when they got back to this country. we did so. it was not before september 15th. we had no access to the sur v l surveillance cameras for weeks which helped to answer a number of questions. but with respec
was privy to those cables of his deep concern about the security there and the need for additional assistance. and i will argue with facts, that after that event took place, after the fall of gadhafi the quote soft footprint was partially to some degree responsible for the tragedy that took place. the american people, and the families of these four brave americans still have not go got gotten the answers that they deserve. i hope that they will get them. >> well, senator i understand your very, very strong feelings, you knew chris, you were a friend of chris, you were one ever the staunchest supporters of the efforts to dislodge gadhafi and try to give the libyan people a chance, and we just have a disagreement. we have a disagreement about what did happen, and when it happened with respect to explaining the sequence of events. we did get to talk to the ds agents when they got back to this country. we did so. it was not before september 15th, we had no access to the surveillance cameras for weeks, which helped to answer a number of questions. but with respect to helping the libyans
and the majority leader have been working hard on some reforms on the filibuster. i am not privy to all of that. i don't know exactly all of the details of it. it was discussed in our policy conference, caucus today. i will say this about at least what i understand to be the essence of the reforms that our majority leader has worked so hard on, and that is that it's better than what we have right now. from what i understand, i don't know all of the details, but from what i understand, it is a step in the right direction. i want to make it clear that i might vote for it, as soon as i find out exactly what it all is, i might vote for it because it's probably better than what we have got right now. but i just want to be clear that my vote for that does not signify that i prefer that overdoing away with this absolute 60-vote threshold, because under the reform rules that i understand that's being prom you promulgated by the majority leader and the minority leader, we still have a 60-vote threshold on anything. except for the motion to proceed. so any amendment, any bill, you still have 60 votes. a sma
, they're very, very, very rich men. they're very privy to what's going on in the country, as far as government contracts and everything, and they get to invest their money in a certain way. harry reid was worth $300,000 when he first went into the senate, and today he's one of the richest men in the senate. how does that happen? know? so i'm really opposed. these guys spend any more than eight years in there. host: all right. homestead, florida on the line for independence. kevin, you're on "washington journal." caller: good morning. thanks for taking my call. host: sure. you're in favor of term limits for elected officials or opposed to it? caller: i am opposed to term limits. host: why is that? caller: back in the 1980's i did an internship in the house of representatives and what i witnessed was a whole group o of -- i guess you would call bureaucrats underneath the elected officials. and they just bounce from representative to representative to representative, senator, and if we get rid of the elected official, i think that the whole congress, congressional system, will be wo
happened that we're not privy too. >> stephanie: yeah, but in my opinion it still doesn't justify us all having military assault weapons. somebody was talking about some of these guys had body armor. what is the point of having body armor if you are not in the military? >> right. unless you plan to be in a combat of some sort. >> stephanie: yeah do you go in bed with it? fifty-eight minutes after the hour. right back on the "stephanie miller show." [♪ theme music ♪] >> stephanie: hello tv world, hour number 3. jacki schechner let's drag you into the body armor discussion. >> okay. >> stephanie: why would one need body armor? that's what we were saying -- >> hum. i don't know. >> unless you are in the military. >> stephanie: right, if you are not a cop or in the military -- >> role play? [ laughter ] >> well. >> wow! jacki's mind defaulted to that. >> no. >> stephanie: if you are paranoid at being attacked. maybe because i'm menopause sal, i'm already sweaty enough. >> your body armor would have like puppies and feet on it. >> stephanie: exactly. here she is jacki schech
will guide us to fixing this broken immigration system and america. you are not privy to what is going on in " -- behind closed doors. i have been heartened. we tackled several of the toughest issues in this bill, issues broken down negotiations in the fast. -- in the past. we are all looking for solutions, realistic and honest and fair solutions. that is the only way we can pass reform. i am glad to hear the president speak out as forcefully as he did about immigration reform. he was a co-sponsor of the dream that when he was here in the senate. he sat with me when we talk about immigration reforms day after day. coming from illinois, he appreciates it as much if not more than any other person. to have this linkage here in that -- in the present, we have a long way to go, and there will be obstacles. a good faith effort being put into this is encouraging to me and gives me hope that for the first time, we can get this done. as the senator reed has said, not for ourselves, but for millions of americans living in chattels and fear of deportation, a future that is so clouded by the prosp
're not really privy to what's going on. it kind of drives me crazy. we're in a democracy and you're supposed to know. but i do feel that when i look at spain, when i look at france, when i look at germany, i look at the united kingdom they do not get caught up in this kind of wrangling. they are better governed nations right now. >> that's easy to say, i guess, when your comparison seems to be what is a completely dysfunctional congress at this point. jim, how do you go about trying to gauge how to even play this? you look at what happened over the end of the year, the fiscal cliff. and at the end of the day you might take away, well, they did get something done and the markets reacted positively. look at the rally in the first week of the year. do you approach it the same way? it seems to be to a certain extent we're not ignoring it, but at least saying i'm not going to -- >> i don't want to own domestic companies as much as i want to own foreign companies. s.a.p. not included. i think some of that's america's shakeup there. i think there are a lot of companies doing well. if you look to pp
, for i've been privy to conversations with.ñl >> pull the mic over close. >> my name is hugh fike sr.. thanks for holding this forum. i'm glad to hear you mentioned the high-grade shotguns that the aristocracy uses in england, and i hope that it doesn't come to that in america, but it seems that that's what politicians are aiming for. that eventually rifles and pistols will be taken out of the citizens' hands and only birding guns will be left. i hope that at some point in the future you have maybe a forum on hospital violence, for example. far more people are killed by medical accidents in america than by guns. [inaudible conversations] >> i'm always fascinated that the first amendment is interpreted so liberally as to include a jar of urine with a crucifix in it, and yet the second amendment is interpreted so strictly that the rights of the people shall not be infringed somehow doesn't apply. in many cases. although i'm glad to hear you say that guns are protected by the second amendment. so what it seems to be happening is that politicians are going after ammunition. they want to
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)